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Using Spring Cache With Apache Ignite

Overview

Spring Cache abstraction provides an annotation-based way to enable caching for Java methods so that the result of a method execution is stored in an external cache storage. Later, if the same method is called with the same set of parameter values, the result will be retrieved from the cache instead of actually executing the method.

Apache Ignite provides the ignite-spring-cache-ext extension that allows to use Apache Ignite Cache as an external storage for the Spring Cache abstraction. The mentioned above integration is achieved by providing implementations of the CacheManager Spring interface. There are two such implementations: SpringCacheManager and IgniteClientSpringCacheManager, which use either Apache Ignite node or Apache Ignite thin client to connect to the Apache Ignite cluster and perform data caching.

Maven Configuration

If you use Maven to manage dependencies in your project, you can add Apache Ignite Spring Cache extension dependencies to the application’s pom.xml file like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-spring-cache-ext</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite-spring-cache-ext.version}</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-core</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite.version}</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-spring</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite.version}</version>
     <exclusions>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
    </exclusions>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
    <version>${spring.version}</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-spring-cache-ext</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite-spring-cache-ext.version}</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-core</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite.version}</version>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.ignite</groupId>
    <artifactId>ignite-spring</artifactId>
    <version>${ignite.version}</version>
     <exclusions>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-core</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-aop</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-expressions</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-beans</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-jdbc</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
        <exclusion>
            <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-tx</artifactId>
        </exclusion>
    </exclusions>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-context</artifactId>
    <version>${spring.version}</version>
</dependency>

Replace ${ignite-spring-cache-ext.version}, ${spring.version}, and ${ignite.version} with an actual version of Apache Ignite Spring Cache extension, Spring, and Apache Ignite dependency you need, respectively.

The table below shows available versions of the Apache Ignite Spring Cache extension and compatible versions of the Apache Ignite and Spring.

Apache Ignite Spring Cache extension version Apache Ignite versions Spring versions

1.0.0

All versions since 2.11.0

All versions since 4.3.0

Apache Ignite Node Cache Manager Configuration

Cluster Connection Configuration

To plug in an Ignite cache into your Spring-based application that uses Ignite node to connect to Apache Ignite cluster you need to perform just two simple steps:

  • Start an Ignite node with proper configuration in embedded mode (i.e., in the same JVM where the application is running). It can already have predefined caches, but it’s not required - caches will be created automatically on first access if required.

  • Configure SpringCacheManager as the cache manager in the Spring application context.

The embedded node can be started by SpringCacheManager itself. In this case you will need to provide a path to either the Ignite configuration XML file or IgniteConfiguration instance via configurationPath or configuration properties respectively (see examples below). Note that setting both is illegal and results in IllegalArgumentException.

Specifying Apache Ignite Node Configuration

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public SpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
        SpringCacheManager mgr = new SpringCacheManager();

        mgr.setConfiguration(new IgniteConfiguration()
            .setIgniteInstanceName("<name of the Ignite node instance>"));
            // Other required configuration parameters.

        return mgr;
   }
}
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cache="http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache/spring-cache.xsd">
    <!-- Provide configuration bean. -->
    <bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.SpringCacheManager">
        <property name="configuration">
            <bean class="org.apache.ignite.configuration.IgniteConfiguration">
                 ...
            </bean>
        </property>
    </bean>

    <!-- Enable annotation-driven caching. -->
    <cache:annotation-driven/>
</beans>

Specifying Path to Apache Ignite XML Node Configuration File

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public SpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
        SpringCacheManager mgr = new SpringCacheManager();

        mgr.setConfigurationPath("<path to an Apache Ignite configuration XML file (path can be absolute or relative to `IGNITE_HOME`)");

        return mgr;
    }
}
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cache="http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache/spring-cache.xsd">
    <!-- Provide configuration file path. -->
    <bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.SpringCacheManager">
        <property name="configurationPath" value="<path to an Apache Ignite configuration XML file (path can be absolute or relative to `IGNITE_HOME`)"/>
    </bean>

    <!-- Enable annotation-driven caching. -->
    <cache:annotation-driven/>
</beans>

Specifying Name of the Manually Started Apache Ignite Node Instance

It’s possible that you already have an Ignite node running when the cache manager is initialized (e.g., it was started using ServletContextListenerStartup). In this case you should simply provide the grid name via igniteInstanceName property. Note that if you don’t set the grid name as well, the cache manager will try to use the default Ignite instance (the one with the null name). Here is an example:

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public SpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
        SpringCacheManager mgr = new SpringCacheManager();

        mgr.setIgniteInstanceName("<name of the Apache Ignite node instance>");

        return mgr;
    }
}
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cache="http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache
         http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache/spring-cache.xsd">
    <!-- Provide grid name. -->
    <bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.SpringCacheManager">
        <property name="igniteInstanceName" value="<name of the Apache Ignite node instance>"/>
    </bean>

    <!-- Enable annotation-driven caching. -->
    <cache:annotation-driven/>
</beans>
Note

Keep in mind that the node started inside your application is an entry point to the whole topology it connects to. You can start as many remote standalone nodes as you need and all these nodes will participate in caching the data.

Dynamic Caches

While you can have all required caches predefined in Ignite configuration, it’s not required. If Spring wants to use a cache that doesn’t exist, the SpringCacheManager will automatically create it.

If otherwise not specified, a new cache will be created with default configuration. To customize it, you can provide a configuration template via dynamicCacheConfiguration property. For example, if you want to use REPLICATED caches instead of PARTITIONED, you should configure SpringCacheManager like this:

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public SpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
        SpringCacheManager mgr = new SpringCacheManager();
        ...

        mgr.setDynamicCacheConfiguration(new CacheConfiguration<>("<cache name>")
            .setCacheMode(CacheMode.REPLICATED));

        return mgr;
    }
}
<bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.SpringCacheManager">
    ...

    <property name="dynamicCacheConfiguration">
        <bean class="org.apache.ignite.configuration.CacheConfiguration">
            <property name="name" value="<cache name>"/>
            <property name="cacheMode" value="REPLICATED"/>
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>

You can also utilize near caches on client side. To achieve this, simply provide near cache configuration via the dynamicNearCacheConfiguration property. By default, near cache is not created. Here is an example:

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public SpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
        SpringCacheManager mgr = new SpringCacheManager();
        ...

        mgr.setDynamicNearCacheConfiguration(new NearCacheConfiguration<>().setNearStartSize(1000));

        return mgr;
    }
}
<bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.SpringCacheManager">
    ...

    <property name="dynamicNearCacheConfiguration">
        <bean class="org.apache.ignite.configuration.NearCacheConfiguration">
            <property name="nearStartSize" value="1000"/>
        </bean>
    </property>
</bean>

Apache Ignite Thin Client Cache Manager Configuration

This chapter shows how to set up IgniteClientSpringCacheManager that relies on Ignite thin client to connect to the Ignite cluster and perform caching.

Important

IgniteClientSpringCacheManager does not support Spring Cache synchronous mode (Cacheable#sync). If this feature is crucial to your application, choose the SpringCacheManager that uses an Ignite node to connect to Ignite cluster.

Cluster Connection Configuration

Cluster connection configuration defines Apache Ignite thin client used by IgniteClientSpringCacheManager to access the cluster. There are several approaches to do this:

Note

It is incorrect to mix multiple approaches - this results in the IllegalArgumentException exception during the manager startup.

Specifying Instance of the Apache Ignite Thin Client

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
   @Bean
   public IgniteClient igniteClient() {
       return Ignition.startClient(new ClientConfiguration().setAddresses("127.0.0.1:10800"));
   }

   @Bean
   public IgniteClientSpringCacheManager cacheManager(IgniteClient cli) {
       return new IgniteClientSpringCacheManager().setClientInstance(cli);
   }
}
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cache="http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
                http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
                http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
                http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache
                http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache/spring-cache.xsd">
    <!--
        Note that org.apache.ignite.IgniteClientSpringBean is available since Apache Ignite 2.11.0 version.
        For Apache Ignite 2.10.0 and earlier `org.apache.ignite.client.IgniteClient` bean should be created
        manually with concern of its connection to the Ignite cluster.
    -->
    <bean id="igniteClient" class="org.apache.ignite.IgniteClientSpringBean">
        <property name="clientConfiguration">
            <bean class="org.apache.ignite.configuration.ClientConfiguration">
                <property name="addresses">
                    <list>
                        <value>127.0.0.1:10800</value>
                    </list>
                </property>
            </bean>
        </property>
    </bean>

    <!-- Provide Apache Ignite thin client instance. -->
    <bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.IgniteClientSpringCacheManager">
        <property name="clientInstance" ref="igniteClient"/>
    </bean>

    <!-- Use annotation-driven cache configuration. -->
    <cache:annotation-driven/>
</beans>

Specifying Apache Ignite Thin Client Configuration

In this case, Apache Ignite thin client instance is started automatically by the IgniteClientSpringCacheManager based on the provided configuration.

@Configuration
@EnableCaching
public class SpringApplicationConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public IgniteClientSpringCacheManager cacheManager() {
       return new IgniteClientSpringCacheManager()
           .setClientConfiguration(new ClientConfiguration()
               .setAddresses("127.0.0.1:10800"));
    }
}
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xmlns:cache="http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
              http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans
              http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans.xsd
              http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache
              http://www.springframework.org/schema/cache/spring-cache.xsd">
    <!-- Provide configuration bean. -->
    <bean id="cacheManager" class="org.apache.ignite.cache.spring.IgniteClientSpringCacheManager">
        <property name="clientConfiguration">
           <bean class="org.apache.ignite.configuration.ClientConfiguration">
               <property name="addresses">
                   <list>
                       <value>127.0.0.1:10800</value>
                   </list>
               </property>
           </bean>
        </property>
    </bean>

    <!-- Use annotation-driven cache configuration. -->
    <cache:annotation-driven/>
</beans>

Dynamic Caches

Dynamic Caches configuration for IgniteClientSpringCacheManager is performed the same way as for SpringCacheManager that uses Apache Ignite node instance to access the cluster.

Example

Once you have added SpringCacheManager to your Spring application context, you can enable caching for any Java method by simply attaching an annotation to it.

Usually, you would use caching for heavy operations, like database access. For example, let’s assume you have a DAO class with averageSalary(…​) method that calculates the average salary of all employees in an organization. You can use @Cacheable annotation to enable caching for this method:

private JdbcTemplate jdbc;

@Cacheable("averageSalary")
public long averageSalary(int organizationId) {
    String sql =
        "SELECT AVG(e.salary) " +
        "FROM Employee e " +
        "WHERE e.organizationId = ?";

    return jdbc.queryForObject(sql, Long.class, organizationId);
}

When this method is called for the first time, SpringCacheManager will automatically create a averageSalary cache. It will also lookup the pre-calculated average value in this cache and return it right away if it’s there. If the average for this organization is not calculated yet, the method will be called and the result will be stored in cache. So next time you request the average salary for this organization, you will not need to query the database.

If the salary of one of the employees is changed, you may want to remove the average value for the organization this employee belongs to, because otherwise the averageSalary(…​) method will return obsolete cached result. This can be achieved by attaching @CacheEvict annotation to a method that updates employee’s salary:

private JdbcTemplate jdbc;

@CacheEvict(value = "averageSalary", key = "#e.organizationId")
public void updateSalary(Employee e) {
    String sql =
        "UPDATE Employee " +
        "SET salary = ? " +
        "WHERE id = ?";

    jdbc.update(sql, e.getSalary(), e.getId());
}

After this method is called, average value for the provided employee’s organization will be evicted from the averageSalary cache. This will force averageSalary(…​) to recalculate the value next time it’s called.

Note

Note that this method receives employee as a parameter, while average values are saved in cache by organizationID. To explicitly specify what is used as a cache key, we used key parameter of the annotation and Spring Expression Language.

The #e.organizationId expression means that we need to extract the value of organizationId property from e variable. Essentially, getOrganizationId() method will be called on provided employee object and the returned value will be used as the cache key.