Ignite for RDBMS Users

Apache Ignite does not require you as a skilled RDBMS user to learn new APIs if you want to start working with an Ignite cluster. All the data processing and SQL schema definition can be accomplished with a familiar SQL syntax. Ignite complies with SQL ANSI-99 standard supporting all SQL and DML commands, including SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, MERGE, DELETE statements and distributed joins. It also provides support for a subset of DDL commands relevant for distributed SQL databases.

Ignite can store data and indexes both in memory and on disk which allows executing distributed SQL queries across different memory layers achieving the performance and scale of in-memory computing together with the disk durability and strong consistency in one system. If the persistence is disabled, Ignite can act as a pure in-memory database.

FeatureRDBMSIgnite
Scalability vertical horizontal
Availability failover only high
Consistency strong strong
In-Memory caching only in-memory store
Persistence
SQL
Key-Value
Collocated Processing
Scalability
RDBMS vertical
Ignite horizontal
Availability
RDBMS failover only
Ignite high
Consistency
RDBMS strong
Ignite strong
In-Memory
RDBMS caching only
Ignite in-memory store
Persistence
RDBMS
Ignite
SQL
RDBMS
Ignite
Key-Value
RDBMS
Ignite
Collocated-Processing
RDBMS
Ignite

The main difference between Ignite and traditional relational databases is that, first, the memory is treated as a fully functional storage, not just as a caching layer, like most databases do. Second, Ignite is horizontally scalable, highly available and supports both key-value APIs and collocated processing approach.

Check SQL section for more details or start using Ignite as a SQL database referring to SQL Getting Started Guide. Also, learn how Ignite is used for relational databases acceleration.